Monday, November 23, 2020

Americans Are Planning a Different Kind of Holiday This Year


My longtime friend Christine grew up in Chicago and most of her large extended family are still firmly rooted in the Midwest. Thanksgiving has always been the time when her family gathered. Much more than Christmas, Thanksgiving has been their time for traditions—the same favorite recipes—no deviation allowed, ever. Annual walks along the shores of Lake Michigan, holiday shopping along the magnificent mile. Long lunches, dinners and conversations. As long as I can remember, she braved long lines, colds and flu, pregnancy, snowstorms and airport closures to be with her family at Thanksgiving.

But this year, her family is putting their traditions on hold

They’ve been frantically emailing and texting for the last few months. Time has taken its toll. Many family members are now in the high-risk group—older, with conditions that make them vulnerable to infection. One nephew has asthma, an uncle recently had a kidney transplant. They’ve considered gathering as usual, but excluding those who are high-risk. But for those who need to fly to the Midwest for the holiday, there is too much resistance. This family will put off their traditional Thanksgiving for the first time in more than 50 years.

Covid cases are on the rise, and each day exceeds the previous day’s record

“I’m not going to tell people not to have a family gathering, because mental health is important, now more than ever,” says epidemiologist Saskia Popescu, PhD, an assistant professor at George Mason University. “But I can’t in good conscience say, ‘Yeah, it’s okay to have a big celebration.’ There is no 100% safe way for two households to get together for the holidays in any area where Covid is circulating, which currently includes the entire United States.”

It’s not just the gatherings, but the getting there

Airplanes have good ventilation and air filtering, but you can’t control who sits near you. If one of those passengers is shedding virus, your risk rises.

If you must go, reduce the risk:

  • Move gatherings outdoors, weather permitting.
  • Wear masks except when eating.
  • Maintain as much physical distance as possible, with six feet as a minimum (more is better).
  • Limit time spent with others, especially indoors.
  • If you must be inside, open the windows if possible, to increase ventilation, or get an air purifier or upgrade your whole-house air filters to help reduce the concentration of any virus particles. If someone is shedding the coronavirus, it can build up in a poorly ventilated space, and the risk grows with each passing minute.

We’re all feeling increased levels of anxiety

We’re all on edge. The chaos of the campaign and the election. An uncertain economy, the insecurity of our jobs—the added responsibility for schooling our kids. Covid adds another layer of ambiguity and fear.

Experts advise us to start the holiday talks with family now

“If you’re the person who’s ready to walk through the door at Aunt Jen’s house, know that your siblings, cousins, and other family members may not be comfortable joining you. We suffer a lot because we are waiting for things to change, as opposed to accepting what is,” says Karen Dobkins, Ph.D, a professor of psychology at UC San Diego. The holidays will be different this year, and there’s no use crying over the loss. Once you’ve accepted the insanity that is 2020, you’re ready to take the next important step.”

This is the time to make new traditions

Rather than fighting the inevitable change and mourning the loss of your traditional holiday, create a new tradition.

  • Think about what you value most about the holiday and replicate it in your own home.
  • If Thanksgiving is about food, replicate that meal in your own home. Get the whole family involved in its preparation. Share it via Zoom with your extended family.
  • This is the season for giving. So many people have lost their homes and livelihoods in the North Bay fires. Contributing to this or other causes could become your new tradition and a way to introduce your kids to the spirit of sharing.
  • Think about family walks, games or bike rides. The possibilities are endless.

Celebrate being together, being grateful for what you have. It’s been a tough year!

Covid has prompted many of our clients to create Living Trusts

Many of our clients are gaining some peace of mind by creating or updating their Living Trusts. Naming your heirs and identifying how you want your estate to be distributed ensure that your family will avoid the painful Probate process.

Our Trust package includes a Power of Attorney and an Advance Healthcare Directive. It also includes a Pour Over Will, and for those families with children under 18, this means that they can name a Guardian rather than having the court appoint one for them.

Best of all, we guide you through it and we prepare the legal documents. At California Document Preparers, for most of our services, we charge one flat fee. We’re helpful, compassionate and affordable.

We service the entire East Bay and North Bay areas

Berkeley, El Cerrito, Richmond, Pinole, Alameda, San Leandro, Castro Valley Newark, San Lorenzo, Concord, Alamo, Danville, Lafayette, Orinda, Moraga, Pleasant Hill, Martinez, Pittsburg, Antioch, Brentwood, Oakley, Discovery Bay, Pleasanton, San Ramon, Livermore, Tracy and Fremont. Our clients also live in the Napa Valley, Benicia, Vallejo, Martinez, Fairfield.

Tuesday, November 10, 2020

Will Covid-19 Reduce the Severity of Flu Season?


Eight months and counting. We can’t get a safe, effective COVID vaccine soon enough. We long to strip off our masks and hug our friends and families again. To throw open the doors of restaurants, bars, theaters, concert halls, movie theaters and sports venues and embrace life once more. But experts caution us that a vaccine may not be the panacea we seek.

What we can learn from the flu vaccine

Let’s take a look at our annual flu shots. Flu vaccines are approximate 50% effective in preventing infection from each season’s flu bug. Flu vaccines are administered annually because the mix of viral strains varies from year to year. Even if the viruses don’t change significantly, our immunity wanes.

Scientists continue to learn about the coronavirus, and they know that it mutates. “If a vaccine was developed that is 50% effective in preventing COVID, it would still be licensed,” said Michael T. Osterholm, infectious disease specialist at the University of Minnesota. “We’d like a higher degree of effectiveness, but as with the flu vaccine, 50% protection is better than zero.

“It will disappear, like magic”, is so not going to happen

Even after being immunized against COVID, we may still have to wear our masks, practice social distancing and frequently wash our hands. It’s not “just disappearing, like magic”, as President Trump predicted.

The good news: We may see a less severe flu season this year

The protective COVID measures that we’ve been practicing well may affect our winter flu season. Experts look to the Southern Hemisphere as a predictor. Australia had a quester flu season this year. “We think that’s because people have been using measures to prevent COVID-19”, said Dr. Kristin Englund, an infectious diseases expert at the Cleveland Clinic in Cleveland, Ohio. Dr. Christopher Ohl, a professor of infectious diseases at Wake Forest Baptist Health in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, agreed that “there is a little bit of hope that the flu season will be a little less severe this year.”

  • Our manic use of hand sanitizers and handwashing will help keep the flu bug at bay.
  • Masks will reduce the airborne transmission of COVID and the common flu.
  • For those who get the flu after being immunized, the illness is likely to be significantly less severe.
  • Health care professionals are optimistic that this also may be the case with a coronavirus vaccine.

Experts are concerned about winter and the convergence of flu and COVID

Health care workers are now focusing on the rate of infections this winter. COVID cases are on the rise here at home and in other countries.

  • In Europe, where COVID is on the rise again, there are new restrictions. Paris has imposed a curfew. London has banned people from different households from meeting indoors.
  • In Iowa and North Dakota, where there are no mask mandates, the virus is surging, with more than 20% positivity rates.
  • Hospitals in some parts of the country have reached capacity, yet the White House’s Office of Science and Technology is celebrating the end of the pandemic. It is no longer controlling the virus.
  • Incredibly, Florida has completely opened up its economy—bars and restaurants, gyms and theaters–no masks or social distancing.

Experts worry that the confluence of COVID and our normal flu season could overwhelm the health care system. Pneumonia can be a complication of the flu, which would further burden hospitals—many with a limited number of ventilators.

Those most vulnerable are seniors, children under five and pregnant women. And as we’ve learned from COVID, those with preexisting conditions are especially at risk.

For those over 65, a high-dose flu vaccine is now available

For people 65 and older, an inactivated vaccine called Fluzone High-Dose is now available and covered by Medicare. It is especially recommended for people living in nursing homes and long-term care facilities. According to a study published in The New England Journal of Medicine, the high-dose vaccine was 24% more effective in preventing flu in older adults than the standard-dose vaccine.

When to get your flu shot? Right now.

October is the ideal time to get a flu shot to ensure that it lasts through the flu season.

COVID has created an urgency on many levels, including creating a Living Trust

As the COVID crisis drags on, more clients are scheduling appointments to create or update their Living Trusts. Our Trust package includes a Power of Attorney and an Advance Healthcare Directive. It also includes a Pour Over Will, and for those families with children under 18, this means that they can name a Guardian rather than having the court appoint one for them.

Creating a Trust helps provide peace of mind during these uncertain times. Best of all, we guide you through it and we prepare the legal documents. At California Document Preparers, for most of our services, we charge one flat fee. We’re helpful, compassionate and affordable.

We service the entire East Bay and North Bay areas

Berkeley, El Cerrito, Richmond, Pinole, Alameda, San Leandro, Castro Valley Newark, San Lorenzo, Concord, Alamo, Danville, Lafayette, Orinda, Moraga, Pleasant Hill, Martinez, Pittsburg, Antioch, Brentwood, Oakley, Discovery Bay, Pleasanton, San Ramon, Livermore, Tracy and Fremont. Our clients also live in the Napa Valley, Benicia, Vallejo, Martinez, Fairfield.

Wednesday, October 28, 2020

Tracking the Coronavirus: One Family’s Super Spreader Event


Children and teenagers frequently help spread the coronavirus

Children and teenagers who get the coronavirus tend to recover quickly, without lingering aftereffects. But here’s where it gets dangerous. Many of these children live in multigenerational families. Their own symptoms may be mild and short-lived, but when they pass the virus on to frail or vulnerable family members, it can have life-threatening consequences.

On the trail of infection that began with a 13-year old girl

According to CDC scientists, one 13-year-old girl became infected with the coronavirus just before an extended family gathering. Eleven other relatives, including her mother and father, two brothers and two grandparents, also became infected.

The potential for children to transmit the disease is well established

This girl was exposed to the coronavirus away from home in June. Four days after the exposure, a rapid antigen test reported a negative result. These antigen tests often produce erroneous results. Two days later, she experienced nasal congestion–her only Covid-19 symptom.

That same day, she, her parents and two brothers traveled to a family gathering that included 20 relatives over the course of three and a half weeks. Fourteen of them stayed in the five-bedroom, two-bathroom house for varying lengths of time, ranging from eight to 25 days. None wore a face mask or social distanced. Six other relatives visited but maintained physical distance and remained outdoors, though none wore a mask.

Twelve of 14 people came down with Covid-19

  • The onset of symptoms appeared up to 18 days after the start of the gathering.
  • Their ages ranged from 9 to 72.
  • The virus could have been spread by any of the people in the group.
  • One person was hospitalized and another went to the ER because of trouble breathing.
  • None of the day visitors—those who stayed outside the house–became ill.

Simple procedures that help keep us safe

“This scenario reemphasizes the need for basic public health precautions–even with people we know and love,” said Dr. Megan L. Ranney, a professor of emergency medicine at Brown who was not involved with the study.

Winter presents new challenges as we move indoors

Knowing or loving someone doesn’t keep that person from transmitting the virus.

  • Physical distancing, face mask use, and hand hygiene help prevent the spread of the coronavirus.
  • If you’re exposed to the coronavirus, you should remain isolated from others for 14 days.

A vaccine just around the corner? Highly unlikely

While the Trump administration keeps telling us that a vaccine is “just around the corner”, don’t count on it. Proving the safety and efficacy of a vaccine, managing its manufacture and distribution is likely a year away. Even if a vaccine is licensed, it may not be 100% effective, and we still may have to wear masks. This is a virus, and it mutates. This season’s vaccine may be less effective on next year’s viral strain.

Getting used to living with the uncertainty of the coronavirus

We’re all aware of increased anxiety levels as we strive to keep our families safe. Here at CDP, we’re seeing more Living Trust clients. They range from young couples with children to seniors wanting to update their existing Trusts.

Our Living Trust package includes a Power of Attorney and an Advance Healthcare Directive. In a Pour Over Wil, make sure there is a plan for who would care for your children and pets if you are rushed to the hospital. We guide you through this, and we prepare the legal documents. At California Document Preparers, for most of our services, we charge one flat fee.

We service the entire East Bay and North Bay areas

Berkeley, El Cerrito, Richmond, Pinole, Alameda, San Leandro, Castro Valley Newark, San Lorenzo, Concord, Alamo, Danville, Lafayette, Orinda, Moraga, Pleasant Hill, Martinez, Pittsburg, Antioch, Brentwood, Oakley, Discovery Bay, Pleasanton, San Ramon, Livermore, Tracy and Fremont. Our clients also live in the Napa Valley, Benicia, Vallejo, Martinez, Fairfield.

Thursday, October 22, 2020

Trending: A Return to Our Rural Roots


Those of us who grew up in small towns understand the ritual of leaving home to pursue our dreams on a bigger, more exciting stage. But sociologists are tracking a new trend. According to a New York Times article, people are returning to their roots–often to those small towns that they couldn’t wait to leave.

The model is changing: Rural life has become more desirable

Our big cities, including  New York City, San Francisco and Los Angeles, are experiencing declining populations—largely because they’ve priced themselves out of the market. But there’s more going on that suggests a national, cross-generational homecoming. Last year, Gallup found that while roughly 80% of us live in urban areas, rural life was really what most people wanted.

A 2018 study by NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health reported that in spite of economic and health concerns, most rural Americans are pretty happy and hopeful.


For rural adults, their lives came out better than they expected

A majority said they were better off financially than their parents at the same age and thought their kids would likewise ascend. As for cultural woes, those under age 50, as well as people of color, showed notably higher acknowledgment of discrimination and commitment to social progress.

University of Minnesota researcher Ben Winchester is now identifying a brain gain in rural America. Mr. Winchester found that from 2000 to 2010, most rural Minnesota counties gained early-career to mid-career residents with ample socioeconomic assets. A third of them are returning, while the rest are new recruits. It’s a longing to return to a simpler, safer, less frenetic way of life. Each has a story of departure, longing and return.


The demographics of this exodus span cultures and race

They are black women missing their families in the rural South, Muslim women organizing workers in meatpacking towns on the plains, young gay men hoping to return to their small-town roots. This is rural America–a place rife with problems yet an increasing diversity, vibrancy and cross-cultural camaraderie.


It’s an American journey that’s come full circle

Political scientist Veronica Womack described the metaphorical significance of her black students at Georgia College considering work in agriculture. “It’s come full circle,” Dr. Womack said. “When our ancestors were made free, land was their pursuit.” So when she says her students are coming home, she explained, she means that they have realized that farming is a “vehicle that I can use to be free.”


They’re entrepreneurs and artisans, redefining success

There’s a prairie trend of young people, drawn by family ties and affordable entrepreneurship, returning to rural and small-town homes after college graduation. They’re opening restaurants or starting small, unconventional farming operations. One college senior founded a direct-to-consumer beef company in Nebraska and sold $52,000 worth of meat in nine months. 


The concept of “home” is subjective

My mom grew up in a small town in Ohio. We lived in Washington state, but every fall, as the leaves began to turn, my mom would tell us how homesick she was–she missed the brilliant fall colors of a small Ohio town. Home for my mom was always Ohio. It’s not surprising that my mom chose another small town to raise her family—this is where my brothers and I grew up. But I couldn’t wait to go away to college and begin tasting the world outside of that bubble. I’ve traveled all over the world, lived in big sprawling cities, and now I’ve returned to my roots, living and thriving in a small town once again. As our lives become more complicated, this kind of lifestyle change is increasingly attractive to those seeking a better quality of life, a safer place to raise their children.


Living with the uncertainty of the coronavirus

With COVID, the cities’ high rents and job losses have played a big part in the urban exodus. We’re all aware of increased anxiety levels as we strive to keep our families safe. Here at CDP, we’re seeing more Living Trust clients. They range from young couples with children to old people wanting to update their existing Trusts. It’s providing peace of mind at a time when we’re all feeling vulnerable.

Our Living Trust package includes a Power of Attorney and an Advance Healthcare Directive. In our Pour Over Will, make sure there is a plan for who would care for your children and pets if you are rushed to the hospital. We guide you through this, and we prepare the legal documents. At California Document Preparers, for most of our services, we charge one flat fee.


We service the entire East Bay and North Bay areas

Berkeley, El Cerrito, Richmond, Pinole, Alameda, San Leandro, Castro Valley Newark, San Lorenzo, Concord, Alamo, Danville, Lafayette, Orinda, Moraga, Pleasant Hill, Martinez, Pittsburg, Antioch, Brentwood, Oakley, Discovery Bay, Pleasanton, San Ramon, Livermore, Tracy and Fremont. Our clients also live in the Napa Valley, Benicia, Vallejo, Martinez, Fairfield.

This article is based on a New York Times story by Sarah Smarsh.

Wednesday, October 14, 2020

Life Planning: It’s Not Just for Old People Anymore


In a New York Times article, two cousins shared their fears about COVID. One had a favor to ask. If she and husband both ended up extremely ill — or worse — would her cousin be willing to drive the 300 miles to her house and get her young sons.

Sadly, tortured conversations like this are happening around the globe.

Concern for their families is prompting many young couples to create Living Trusts

Life planning isn’t just for old peopleFor those with children under 18, creating a Living Trust has an even more important role. Our Living Trust package includes a Pour Over Will that allows them to name a Guardian. If something happens to them, this Guardian will care for their children—not someone whom the court appoints.

Only one out of three adults has taken the time to complete an Advance Healthcare Directive. This legal document allows you to identify the person who will speak for you if you become incapacitated. We include an Advance Healthcare Directive in our Living Trust package.

Be Prepared: Pack a bag with essentials

COVID is highly contagious and unpredictable. It’s especially important for the elderly and those in the high-risk group to pack a bag with essentials in case you are rushed to the hospital. Think of what you’ll need–glasses, phone, charger, medications and a list of those to contact if necessary.

For those most at risk, The National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization has published a new tool to help make decisions about whether to go to the hospital if you become seriously ill with the coronavirus, or stay at home with the support of hospice or palliative care services.

COVID will be with us for a while

We’re six-plus months into this wretched disease, and we’re at least a year away from a safe, effective vaccine. Even with a vaccine, it’s not unlikely that it will not be 100% efficient. It may be necessary to continue wearing masks and following protocols. While our risks may diminish, they may not be completely eliminated. Having a plan in place is the best preparation for ensuring that you are treated as you would wish. It also provides needed clarity for your loved ones. Stories about the inability to visit their loved ones and of these patients ultimately dying alone has prompted many to create their Living Trusts.

Creating a Living Trust is providing peace of mind to many Bay Area families

As the COVID crisis drags on, more clients are scheduling appointments to create or update their Living Trusts. As noted our Trust package includes a Power of Attorney, an Advance Healthcare Directive and a Pour Over Will.

Best of all, we guide you through it and we prepare the legal documents

At California Document Preparers, for most of our services, we charge one flat fee. We’re helpful, compassionate and affordable.

We service the entire East Bay and North Bay areas

Berkeley, El Cerrito, Richmond, Pinole, Alameda, San Leandro, Castro Valley Newark, San Lorenzo, Concord, Alamo, Danville, Lafayette, Orinda, Moraga, Pleasant Hill, Martinez, Pittsburg, Antioch, Brentwood, Oakley, Discovery Bay, Pleasanton, San Ramon, Livermore, Tracy and Fremont. Our clients also live in the Napa Valley, Benicia, Vallejo, Martinez, Fairfield.


Thursday, October 8, 2020

Balancing Love and Life in the Time of COVID


While COVID has been devastating for business, it’s also taking a toll on relationships. The stress of being together 24/7, trying to homeschool the kids while managing their own workloads can create volatile situations. In many cases, there’s additional stress when partners work in essential, high-risk jobs where they’re exposed to COVID, worrying they’ll bring the disease home to their families. The following scenario describes a situation with which many couples are likely familiar.

In New York: “I can’t take it anymore.”

After seven years and two children, “I can’t take it anymore.” One New Yorker stormed out of their 700 sq ft apartment in tears. She and her partner had weathered miscarriages, birth of two children and a cross-country move.

But it was the pandemic, the months of isolation and sheltering in place, that brought their relationship to the breaking point. One partner a healthcare worker, exposed to the virus every day in long, punishing shifts. The other stuck at home trying to work while caring for two toddlers. No family to provide support or discretionary money for child care. It’s easy to understand how relationships are pushed to the breaking point.

One in ten couples is likely to separate because of pandemic-related problems

  • According to an Ipsos poll released Aug. 4, studies have shown that financial problems, an unequal division in parenting and household responsibilities are among the top reasons couples separate or file for divorce.
  • Miami family law attorney Aliette Carolan has seen an increase in the number of couples filing for divorce. “If you were on the cusp of a divorce before COVID, this is likely to push that relationship over the edge.”
  • Cynthia Rogers, M.D., child psychiatrist and associate professor of psychiatry and pediatrics at Washington University in St. Louis, explained: “The constant anxiety that many of us feel can place an enormous strain on relationships, especially now as parents are making decisions about their children’s schooling.”
  • Anxiety is exacerbated by the realization that the government is doing nothing to halt or manage the pandemic, further increasing the feelings of isolation and futility.

Yet incomes can be uncertain, house and other asset values may have shrunk. People are unsure of what they can afford. Many worry that trying to divorce during these uncertain times may be out of reach.

If you and your spouse are thinking about Divorce

California Document Preparers has been assisting couples with Divorce since 2003. If you and your spouse can agree on a parenting plan and division of property, we can save you a lot of money. The best part is that we guide you through it and we prepare the legal documents. Contact us to talk to us about your amicable Divorce.

We service the entire East Bay and North Bay areas

Berkeley, El Cerrito, Richmond, Pinole, Alameda, San Leandro, Castro Valley Newark, San Lorenzo, Concord, Alamo, Danville, Lafayette, Orinda, Moraga, Pleasant Hill, Martinez, Pittsburg, Antioch, Brentwood, Oakley, Discovery Bay, Pleasanton, San Ramon, Livermore, Tracy and Fremont. Our clients also live in the Napa Valley, Benicia, Vallejo, Martinez, Fairfield.

Tuesday, September 29, 2020

New Learning on COVID: It’s Attacking the Heart


Emerging data show that some of the coronavirus’s most potent damage is inflicted on the heart

It seems like a lifetime ago, but at one time we were naive enough to think that COVID was an infection specific to the lungs. We’ve learned a lot in the last six months. We now know that there is hardly any part of the body this virus doesn’t attack. Some of the virus’s most potent damage is inflicted on the heart, and it can result in organ failure.

Meet Eduardo Rodriguez, poised to start as #1 pitcher for the Boston Red Sox

In July the 27-year-old tested positive for COVID. “I’ve never been that sick in my life, and I don’t want to get that sick again.” His symptoms abated, but he felt so tired after throwing 20 pitches during practice that trainers told him to stop and rest. Tests showed he had a condition many are still struggling to understand: COVID-associated myocarditis. Mr. Rodriguez won’t be taking the mound in the 2020 season.

And a patient in his early 50s with COVID-related heart disease

Myocarditis means inflammation of the heart muscle. Some patients are never bothered by it, but for others it can have serious implications. One 50-year old patient had been in perfect health with no history of serious illness when he contracted COVID. When the fevers and body aches started, he isolated himself and waited to get better. But his condition deteriorated and he accumulated gallons of fluid in his legs. When he came to the hospital unable to catch a breath, it wasn’t his lungs that had pushed him to the brink–it was his heart. He is now being evaluated to see if he needs a heart transplant.

MRI scans of patients recovered from COVID

A German study examines the way SARS-CoV-2 affects the heart. Researchers studied 100 individuals, with a median age of just 49, who had recovered from COVID. Researchers performed MRI scans of their hearts and made some alarming discoveries: Nearly 80% had persistent abnormalities and 60% had evidence of myocarditis. The degree of myocarditis was not explained by the severity of the initial illness.

Though the study has some flaws, it makes clear that in young patients who had seemingly overcome SARS-CoV-2 it’s fairly common for the heart to be affected. We may be seeing only the beginning of the damage. Despite treatment, more severe forms of Covid-19-associated myocarditis can lead to permanent damage of the heart, which in turn can lead to heart failure.

Deferred care results in a bump in heart attacks and death

Since February 2020, nearly 25,000 more Americans have died of heart disease than in the same period in previous years. Some of these deaths could be put down to COVID, but the majority are likely to be because patients deferred care for their hearts. That could lead to a wave of untreated heart disease in the wake of the pandemic.

The AMA’s Message: Don’t Die of Doubt

The American Heart Association has a new campaign called “Don’t Die of Doubt” to address the alarming reduction in people calling 911 or seeking medical care after a heart attack or stroke.

  • It’s been clear that high-risk people are those who are overweight, have diabetes or high blood pressure. Add those with heart conditions to that high-risk list. The CDC recommends that the more than 30M Americans living with heart disease take extra precautions.
  • Doctors and researchers should no longer think of Covid-19 as a disease of the lungs but as one that can affect any part of the body, especially the heart.
  • The only way to prevent more people dying of heart disease, both from damage caused by the virus as well as from deferred care of heart disease, is to control the pandemic.

COVID has created an urgency on many levels, including creating a Living Trust

As the COVID crisis drags on, more clients are scheduling appointments to create or update their Living Trusts. Our Trust package includes a Power of Attorney and an Advance Healthcare Directive. It also includes a Pour Over Will, and for those families with children under 18, it means that they can name a Guardian rather than having the court appoint one for you. Creating a Trust helps provide peace of mind during these uncertain times. Best of all, we guide you through it and we prepare the legal documents. At California Document Preparers, for most of our services, we charge one flat fee. We’re helpful, compassionate and affordable.

We service the entire East Bay and North Bay areas

Berkeley, El Cerrito, Richmond, Pinole, Alameda, San Leandro, Castro Valley Newark, San Lorenzo, Concord, Alamo, Danville, Lafayette, Orinda, Moraga, Pleasant Hill, Martinez, Pittsburg, Antioch, Brentwood, Oakley, Discovery Bay, Pleasanton, San Ramon, Livermore, Tracy and Fremont. Our clients also live in the Napa Valley, Benicia, Vallejo, Martinez, Fairfield.

The source of this article: Haider Warraich (@haiderwarraich), the author of “State of the Heart: Exploring the History, Science, and Future of Cardiac Disease,” is a cardiologist and researcher at the Veterans Affairs Boston Healthcare System, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School.